Do WHAT With My Placenta??

Do WHAT With My Placenta??

So you're expecting a baby, and everyone is giving you advice. 
"You need this stroller; it's a lifesaver!" 
"Make sure baby eats every 2 hours!"
"Don't use that brand of diaper! You'll have poop explosions; they leak!"
"You have to encapsulate your placenta! I did, and it was wonderful!"

Wait, what was that about a placenta? 

Placenta Encapsulation is a way of ingesting the placenta, and it's a decision that's gaining popularity. It may sound bizarre, but the placenta is filled with hormones that can benefit many new mothers. 

BRAINED: Decision Making for Labor (and Life)

BRAINED: Decision Making for Labor (and Life)

Labor can be an intense, stressful time. Many people go into the birth process with a "birth plan," or a list of ideals they wish to stick to. These are often well researched ideas the family is comfortable with. But what happens when suddenly your doctor comes in and says those ideas need to change? Whether the doctor suggests additional interventions or even talks about changing the type of delivery, sometimes births do not go as planned. How can you make such a potentially huge decision during a high-stress, vulnerable time? 

Choosing a Provider

Choosing a Provider

Whether you've been trying to conceive for months or you've just found out you're expecting a surprise, one of the first decisions to be made is who to go to for prenatal care. 

In many areas, the main options for maternity care providers are Obstetricians and Midwives. Sometimes Family Practitioners attend births as well. In our local area of Columbia, SC, the choice is mainly between OBs, Certified Nurse Midwives, and Licensed Midwives.

So what's the difference between them all?

Affording a Doula

Affording a Doula

Having personal, in-person doula support through your labor is an investment, and people may be surprised at cost of hiring a doula. The prices doulas charge varies widely, often anywhere from $350 to $1,200 or more. With such a wide range of prices, many families may feel that they cannot afford a doula. While the total cost might seem daunting, there is a variety of creative options you may be able to draw from to cover the fee. 

 

Correlation Vs. Causation: The Safety of Placenta Encapsulation

You may have seen the case report from the CDC making the rounds on social media lately claiming that a baby developed a dangerous Group B Strep (GBS) infection because the mother was ingesting placenta capsules. While this study seems to call into question the safety of placenta encapsulation, there are a few points to note: 

  1.  This was a single case.

    While it is terrible that a baby did become ill, there has only been one case of illness reported that may have been linked to placenta capsules. This is not a growing trend. 
     
  2.  Correlation does not automatically mean causation. 

    While the CDC has documented the illness is thought to be caused by the mother ingesting the placenta capsules, that has not been proven. The CDC themselves state that other family members could also be the carriers responsible, and the mother could have become infected after her initial negative test. 

    The mother's breastmilk tested negative for GBS. If the infection did not stem from the birth, it is unclear how the mother was then passing along GBS bacteria for baby to become infected. 

  3.  Placenta Encapsulation is an unregulated industry; it appears that the encapsulator from this study may not have followed proper safety procedures. 

    The CDC report states that the placenta in question was dehydrated at temperatures between 115-160 degrees Fahrenheit. If this is correct, then this placenta was not prepared in a safe fashion capable of killing off harmful bacteria. Temperatures must be held high enough and long enough to properly destroy any grown bacteria.

    If there were any signs of active infection at the time of birth or soon after (and generally at least mother or baby are presenting with fever or other signs of infection), then the placenta should never have been processed. It is never safe to consume placenta products with an active infection present. 

At Little Orchids, safety is our first priority. We adhere to strict training and certification standards to ensure a safe product.

So what do we do differently?

Strong Disinfectants- All of our non-disposable equipment pieces are cleaned and sanitized both before and after each use. They are washed, rinsed, soaked in a 1:10 bleach solution, allowed to air dry in a closed area, then wiped down with a hospital-grade disinfectant and allowed to completely air dry.  The hospital grade disinfectant that we use is a virucide, bactericide, tuberculocide, and fungicide.  It kills HIV, Hep- B, Hep-C, TB, MRSA and Norovirus and meets or exceeds blood-borne pathogen standards.

Disposable Protective Equipment - We use disposable equipment as much as possible to reduce the risk of cross contamination between clients. Disposable equipment that we use for each client includes gloves, plastic food aprons, hair nets, booties, safety glasses, cutting boards, and face masks.

Safety Screening- If there are signs of infection in mother or baby, then we do not perform an encapsulation. It's just not worth the risk. 

Scheduling Checks - We never have more than one placenta in our possession at any given time. We are very careful to not overbook so that there is no possible chance of accidental mix-ups. The placenta products you receive are 100% definitely made from your placenta. 

At Little Orchids, we want you to be completely confident in your decision to encapsulate with us. We welcome any and all questions you may have! You've grown your placenta for the last 9+ months, and it is something you plan to ingest; it is important to feel safe with who will be processing the placenta. 

Our encapsulator is a Certified Postpartum Placenta Encapsulation Specialist and is also a certified ServSafe Foodhandler and certified in Blood-bourne Pathogens training. We adhere to these stringent training protocols for a reason: it allows us to deliver a safe, quality product each and every time. 

If you have any questions about out placenta encapsulation services or our training standards, please contact us today

 

Fear and Birth

Fear and Birth

 Fear can have detrimental effects in labor. In some ways, labor requires the mother to let go, both mentally and physically. The mother must allow the body to take over and do what is needed to dilate and help get the baby out. Fear can block this necessary and instinctual action. Fear can cause the mother to experience “psychological dystocia” which is a term used when labor slows or is inhibited by a non-physical issue. Fear can cause the mother to clench and fight contractions, which can affect the speed and ease of dilation. Many mothers have reported that contractions are more painful if the mother tries to clench or fight them. Thankfully, women have multiple ways to deal with this fear response.

Postpartum Realities

Postpartum Realities

Experiences and expectations of the postpartum period can be completely different from one person to another. Because of this, new mothers can become confused when their experiences do not align with what their friends or family members described. The postpartum period vary greatly from the beginning, especially depending on the type of birth there was.     

5 Birth Myths You Should Know About

5 Birth Myths You Should Know About

Birth can be an amazing, yet intimidating process for many people. Everyone has different views on birth, and everyone who's had a child has different thought and memories about their experiences. With so many different views and with policies and protocols changing through the years, it is not a surprise that sometimes popular information is actually myth. Don't believe me? Here are 5birth myths that you should know about!

A Beginner's Guide to Labor

A Beginner's Guide to Labor

Labor

One word can stir up so many emotions. Excitement. Fear. Dread. Joy. Maybe even a combination of all of the above. 

The start of labor can be a scary prospect for a new family. How will you know for sure when it's really time? Will it hurt? How long will it take? 

Even if you've had a baby before, each labor is different. 

So how can you quell some of the fear?

Recognizing Postpartum Depression

Recognizing Postpartum Depression

The days, weeks, and months after having a baby can be stressful. Is baby eating enough? Is she sleeping enough? WHY WON'T HE SLEEP?? Many new mothers have another fear: what happens if she develops postpartum depression?

 

Perceived mental illness of any kind has been a stigma in our society. But why? up to 85% of women have some form of postpartum mood disorder in the year after having a baby. In addition to this, around 400,000 babies are born each year to mothers already diagnosed with depression. So really, why is postpartum mood health still viewed often as a taboo topic? Why don't we talk about how common it is to go through these mood changes after having a baby? Women need to understand that mood disorders are not a sign of weakness. They are not defects. They are common and completely treatable. But in order to be treated, they have to be recognized. 

Placenta Encapsulation: What Makes Us Different

Placenta Encapsulation: What Makes Us Different

Little Orchids Childbirth Services, LLC is proud to offer placenta encapsulation to our wonderful clients. Consuming one's placenta is becoming a popular choice in this area, and there are numerous reported benefits. Choosing a qualified person to prepare your placenta for you to ingest is an important decision. It is important for the person you choose to follow proper safety protocols that keep the placenta safe to consume.

The fact is that placenta encapsulation is a completely unregulated industry. Anyone can decide to offer placenta encapsulation; there are no legal requirements to certify or even have any training to handle and process placentas. 

So what makes us different? 

Delayed Cord Clamping: The New Recommendations

Delayed Cord Clamping: The New Recommendations

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recently updated their recommendations concerning the timing of clamping and cutting the umbilical cord after birth. While their previous recommendations had included delaying cord clamping for preterm infants, newer research has highlighted the benefits gained by term infants as well. 

 

ACOG now recommends that cord clamping be delayed for at least 30-60 seconds after the birth in all healthy term and preterm infants.